2017-12-11 04:29:40

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Media Contact: Barbara M. Fornasiero; EAFocus Communications; 248-260-8466; barbara@eafocus.com
 
Troy, Mich. —October 23, 2017— Practice Transformation Institute (PTI), a non-profit organization providing continuing medical education and customized learning programs that improve health outcomes and the individual care delivery experience, is pleased to announce it has received accreditation for its care coordination and care management training programs by the Michigan Nurses Association, an approver of continuing nursing education by the Michigan Board of Nursing.
 
The accreditation is valid for two years, Sept. 21, 2017 through Sept. 21, 2019, and was granted following a peer review by the Michigan Nurses Association’s Continuing Education Approval Program (CEAP) Committee. In commenting on the curriculum for the approved PTI programs, which were developed by PTI staff members Carla Irvin, R.N. and Ginny Hosbach, B.S.N, M.S.N., the CEAP Committee noted it was provider-directed and learner-paced, with enduring material.
 
“This accreditation is especially meaningful for PTI because it is unusual for a non-nursing organization to receive such a designation,” Ewa Matuszewski, PTI principal and founder, said. “It’s a reflection of the effort that PTI staff members have committed to making the care management and care coordination programs impactful for both clinical and non-clinical participants.”
 
PTI’s next Care Coordination and Care Management Training session, designed to educate health care professionals in the specifics of primary care management of chronic conditions, is set for Nov. 1-2 in Rochester. Registration can be done online. The program is approved for 20 contact hours by the Michigan Nurses Association, an approver of continuing nursing education by the Michigan Board of Nursing. Further, PTI is authorized by IACET to offer 2.0 CEUs for this program. In addition to care management programs, PTI offerings include the National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP,) lifestyle coaching, Stanford Self-Management programs, A Matter of Balance, patient-centered-medical-home facilitation, learning collaboratives and a variety of training webinars.

Media Contact: Barbara M. Fornasiero; EAFocus Communications; 248-260-8466; barbara@eafocus.com
 
Troy, Mich. —September 20, 2017—Starting October 3, Practice Transformation Institute (PTI), a non-profit organization providing continuing medical education and customized learning programs that improve health outcomes and the individual care delivery experience, will present the National Diabetes Prevention Program to educate individuals on the importance of moderate lifestyle changes and how increased physical activity may cut the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by as much as half. PTI lifestyle coach Carla Irvin, RN, BSN, said this one-hour weekly series is ideal for people who have been diagnosed with prediabetes or are at risk for developing the disease.
 
“Over the course of the 16 week core sessions, participants will work with a trained Lifestyle Coach and their group to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to promoting sustainable lifestyle changes,” Irvin explained. “The Lifestyle Coach is someone who understands the difficulty of this lifestyle change and will work to equip participants with small changes they can readily make to eat healthier and be active over time.”
 
The National Diabetes Prevention Program was developed by the CDC as an effective lifestyle change program to prevent or delay Type 2 diabetes. In this program, participants will learn to:
 
• Read food labels
• Managesocial/food cues
• Use ‘My Plate’guidelines
• Problem-solve
• Deal with stress
• Apply proper portion control
• Include physical activity in their daily lives
 
In addition to the weekly sessions, the program follows with separate monthly maintenance lessons, which provide additional support and cover more specific topics such as tackling holidays and special events, time management, food preparation/recipe modification, and long-term maintenance.The entire program runs October 3, 2017 – September 11, 2018.
 
The National Diabetes Prevention Program will be held every Tuesday from 1:00 to–2:00 p.m. for 16 weeks beginning October 3 at the Country Creek Medical Building, 4986 N. Adams Road, Rochester, 48306. The maintenance program follows with monthly sessions. Participants will meet in the large conference room. To register or for more information, email yyang@transformcoach.org or call 248.475.4839. The program is free.

Media Contact: Barbara M. Fornasiero; EAFocus Communications; 248-260-8466; barbara@eafocus.com
 
Troy, Mich. —March 17, 2017—Practice Transformation Institute (PTI), a non-profit organization providing continuing medical education and customized learning programs that improve health outcomes and the individual care delivery experience, is noting that employers can play a role in healthy eating education this month, which is National Nutrition Month. The results can be healthier, happier and more productive employees and, ultimately, reduced health care costs for employers. PTI trainer Carla Irvin, RN, BSN, PCMH, CCE has written extensively on the topic.
 
“Busy employees can get healthier through employer education on good eating habits while also helping to create a culture of well-being,” Irvin said.
 
Irvin says there are some key education points employers can easily share via posters, webinars, and lunch and learns to help team members make informed food choices and develop good eating habits. She offers some quick tips:
 

    • Know the difference between a portion size and a serving size. A portion size is what you put on your plate. A serving size is the amount that is used to calculate the nutrients in our food; it’s what is on the food label.
    • Understand food labels. There is a lot of good information on food labels, such as serving size, calories, fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, protein and the ever-important ingredient list. If you’re on a special diet, unsure of serving size or just want to know what you’re eating, take a look at that label. You’ll be a more informed consumer.

• Become familiar with MyPlate. The United States Department of Agriculture uses the image of a regular plate to recommend what a healthy diet would include. The plate is divided in half with four sections for fruits, vegetables, grains and proteins. Eating a variety of food isn’t difficult if we use this plate method as our guide. Get familiar with it and strive for that rainbow on your plate. https://www.choosemyplate.gov
• Strive for healthy eating. Eat fresh. Mix up your diet for nutrients and taste. Choose your snacks wisely. Aim for meals three times a day and space those meals out at regular intervals. Never skip breakfast as it fuels your day after fasting all night. Limit pop and other sugary drinks. Watch that salt intake. Choose foods with good fats like nuts and olive oil. Eat whole grains like whole grain pasta, cereals, bread and brown rice.
• Learn more about processed foods. How do we separate the minimally processed from the heavily processed? That name gets a bad rep, but many items can be called ‘processed’ that are good for us. Have a read and be able to separate the good from the bad. http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/nutrition-facts-and-food-labels/avoiding-processed-foods
 
Irvin encourages employers to take special note of the physical and financial costs of an unhealthy work force, and notes that diabetes is a public health issue that can be addressed in a variety of forums, including the workplace.
 
“For people who are specifically at-risk for Type 2 diabetes, there is an urgent need to start eating healthier and increasing physical activity; employers can help by bringing certified diabetes prevention programs into the workplace,” Irvin said, adding that employees with diabetes incur an estimated additional $10,000 in annual health care costs due to diabetes-related co-morbidities such as hypertension, high cholesterol, obesity and retinal eye disease.
 
The National Diabetes Prevention Program, for example, was developed at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and is a lifestyle change-focused year-long program for adults with a high risk for Type 2 diabetes. Participants learn how to include healthy eating and physical activity into their daily lives. The program consists of 16 sessions of core learning followed by six sessions for the last six months to reinforce and build on content. PTI has lifestyle coaches who can bring this program to employers and community organizations. For information about this and other employer programs offered by PTI, please contact Carla Irvin at 248.310.8476 or cirvin@transformcoach.org.